52museum – Day 5

Post 1: Agnes Slott-Møller
Today we will be focusing on Danish woman artists of the turn of the century 1900 represented in the collections at the Vejen Arts Museum. This first post is Agnes Slott-Møller’s poppy poster. It is presumed to be from the 1890’s. She travelled to England several times and was very interested in the Pre-Raphaelite Movement.

Post 2: Gabriele Rohde
In 1888 Gabriele Rohde (->) was part of the first group of woman artists at the Royal Academy in Copenhagen. She married the sculptor Niels Hansen Jacobsen and travelled with him through Europe settling in Paris in 1892 in La Cité Fleurie at 65, boul. Arago. Luckily she was well educated; writing and speaking fluent French. She became her husband’s “agent/dealer”. Very little is known of her work – at present a count of five pieces at most!

Post 3: Gabriele Jacobsen
Gabriele Jacobsen, née Rohde, modelled a relief portrait of her husband, the sculptor Niels Hansen Jacobsen. It was on show at the Paris World Fair 1900 and has been brought down in art history as a self-portrait – but the version in the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg (@mkg.hamburg) is clearly signed by her. It also carries his initials, NHJ, most likely because he glazed and fired the stoneware mask.

Post 4: Anna E. Munch (video)
The Danish painter Anna E. Munch in 1894 studied in Paris with the French history painter Jean Paul Laurens. In 1893 and again in 1897 she travelled to Britany staying in La Pouldu where she portrayed the inn keepers Marie Therèse and Pierre Joseph Goulven. Among the fishermen families on the west coast of Jutland she later met a similar kind of intense religiousness as shown in the two devout women walking home from a sermon.

Post 5: Henriette Hahn-Brinckmann (video)
In 1899 the Danish artist Henriette Hahn cut the woodprint of the autumn beech forest with arum. While she was visiting the Paris World Fair 1900 she made her studies for the portrait of the sculptor Niels Hansen Jacobsen at the window of his home at La Cité Fleurie – 65, boul. Arago. In the mid 1890’s she was given a set of Japanese woodprint tools by the founder of the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg, Justus Brinckmann – the German advocate of all things Japanese and of the Art Nouveau. They married in 1902 and her woodprint production came to a halt. After his death she later took up printing and made the flower piece in 1925 and the following year produced the print of the deer in the mist. All four prints are presently in the show on Nordic Japonism at the National Gallery in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Music: ‘Impressionisme (Impression, soleil levant) – tilegnet David Abramovitz’ by Anders Tærsbøl Feddersen

Post 6: Elise Konstantin-Hansen
Elise Konstantin-Hansen grew up in a strong artistic milieu. Her father Constantin Hansen and his colleagues were all a part of the Danish Golden Age. She took an artistic career for granted and was soon a member of the artist society “Den frie Udstilling” (@denfrieudstillingsbygning) – the Danish secessionist movement. There she in 1893 exhibited her huge watercolour drawing of the wild vulture (1,18 x 1,31 meters). It is presently a part of the show on Nordic Japonism at the National Gallery in Copenhagen.

Post 7: Susette Holten, née Skovgaard (video)
Susette Holten, née Skovgaard, grew up in the same strong artistic milieu as Elise Konstantin-Hansen (previous post). Her father P.C. Skovgaard and his colleagues were all a part of the Danish Golden Age. She also took an artistic career for granted and was a founding member of the artist society “Den frie Udstilling” – the Danish secessionist movement. A true art nouveau artist she worked as a painter and in the decorative arts. Both the bulb shaped ceramic vase and the plate decorated with a Japanese doll and a goose are signed and dated 1889. The watercolour of the vase of tulips is from 1901 and the pillow decorated with branches of rose-hips is from the mid 1930’s.
The ceramic vase is on loan to the Japonism exhibition at the National Gallery in Copenhagen.
Music: ‘Impressionisme (Impression, soleil levant) – tilegnet David Abramovitz’ by Anders Tærsbøl Feddersen

Post 8: Women Artists Working in Clay (video)
We leave you today with a very brief introduction by our museum director Teresa Nielsen to ‘Women Artists Working in clay’: From the 1910’s Cathinca Olsen was in the stoneware department of the Bing & Grøndahl Factory. One of her special effects was cutting lightly or quite deeply into the pots. Eva Stæhr-Nielsen’s iconic jug was made at SAXBO from 1932 till the workshop closed in 1968. The spout and handle are bent from a split cylindric neck. The Vejen Art Museum in 2015 made a huge SAXBO-show and a database with over 1300 pieces.

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